Working in the Face of Adversity

We live in a world that is wrought with problems. Hardships of all kinds effect millions of people across the entire globe. With a global economic system shaken by the effects of a recession which still lingers years on, doing good work to help others only becomes more difficult. Natural disasters also continue regardless of anything with many people dying everyday from earthquakes, droughts, volcanoes and every other horrific thing this planet throws at its inhabitants. Despite all this, it hasn’t stopped people from dedicating their lives to helping others to overcome what would have been insurmountable odds. Still, even with people everywhere getting poorer, people donate their hard earned money so that those truly in the thick of it can carry on their invaluable work wherever it maybe. The Kilimanjaro Centre for Orphans & Street Children is one of those places.

People of all creeds, colours and ages are affected by the events described above, but there are none so disproportionately so than children. They are often weaker and more prone to illness, less educated in how to deal with life and they all too often become orphans in the blink of an eye. This is why the Kilimanjaro Centre is so important. Without them many children would have been left to fend for themselves for the rest of their lives with no real chance to escape the poverty that had been thrust upon them. Founded in June 2006 by Michael Mpombo, the centre is based in rural Moshi, Tanzania. It works incredibly hard to try and better the lives of orphans and street children in the area. They run three programs at the moment including Residential Care, Education and Outreach. They have dedicated themselves to creating a world of equal opportunities for all children and to provide a safe place where street children and orphans can be provided with the basic necessities of life. They are of the opinion that without proper help, these kids will become a lost generation in their own country.

Moshi, where the centre is based, is an ideal town for their work. It is the cleanest town in all of Tanzania and it has some of the highest literacy rates for men and women in the country. The town also has a great education system in place including primary, secondary and higher education institutions. On top of all that, business is thriving with some great industires based there along with the incredible Soko La Kati market. With Moshi on the road to becoming a city, it is a fantastic place to prepare children for the real world. There is no doubt that with their time at the Kilimanjaro Centre completed, they will be ready to step out into Moshi and take advantage of all the great things this town has to offer.

The Education Program they offer has had great results. Over the five years it has been running 500 children and youths have gone through it and into more education within schools and colleges. On top of that 300 more kids have also been trained in street business, taken up apprenticeships and trained in tailoring and computer use. The centre make sure they offer a wide ranging set of options to ensure they can get the kids into the things they’re really suited for. In the Kilimanjaro region it is thought there are more than 5000 children who are orphans and street children. This makes the Centre’s Residential Care program so very important. Through this, a safe place for these children can be offered so that they no longer have to expose themselves to the dangers of the street. It also offers healthcare, clothes and guidance to children among a long list of other things. Of course, doing all this superb work does not help to end the problems in the long run. The Centre’s Outreach Program was made to do just that. The Outreach Program works with communities in order to discover the true causes of the country’s problems and find a way to tackle them.
They work extensively to plan for the future rather than just fix the present.

The Kilimanjaro Centre is a massive force for good in the area and is only going to get better. They are currently planning on bringing in an Uncle and Aunt Program, a Research Program and an Outreach Health Education Program. The Centre is not interesting in being satisfied with the small-scale side of things, they are looking at the big picture. If you base them off all the hard work they have already done, it is easy to see they’re going to do a lot more good for Tanzanian children.

*Janet Horseman is a freelance writer from England who writes on behalf of a wedding planning business which provides wedding favours (http://www.justminiatures.co.uk). She takes the opportunity to write for good causes such as the Kilimanjaro Centre as often as she can.*

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